August 25, 2010

Are ‘refined’ carbohydrates worse than saturated fat?

Posted in Adelaide, Research, schools, science, seminar tagged , , , , , , , , , , at 6:07 am by cascius

The Inaugural Innovation in Food Lecture

Date/Time: Monday 6th September, 4pm

Location: Plant Research Centre Auditorium, Waite Campus

School of Agriculture, Food & Wine Named Lecture Series: Innovation in Food Lecture 2010

Speaker: Professor Jennie Brand-Miller, University of Sydney

Are ‘refined’ carbohydrates worse than saturated fat?

The take home message from health authorities for the past three decades has been ‘eat less fat, especially saturated fat’. Now a new paradigm is arising: that the processed carbohydrates which replaced the energy from fat, may increase the risk of obesity, diabetes and heart disease more so than fat – a finding that has enormous implications for the Australian food and agricultural industry.  Both quantity and quality of carbohydrate are relevant to the debate. The rate of digestion and absorption of carbohydrates is assessed as their ‘glycemic index’ (GI). This lecture will focus on well-designed studies demonstrating that carbohydrates that are slowly digested and absorbed (i.e. low GI carbs) are good for health and reduce risk factors associated with lifestyle-related diseases such as diabetes. Improving carbohydrate quality is therefore a better approach to health and sustainability issues than ‘ditching the carbs’. Professor Jennie Brand-Miller is recognised for her work on carbohydrates and diabetes. Her books under the series title The New Glucose Revolution have sold over 3.5 million copies worldwide and appeared in 12 languages.

The inaugural Innovation in Food Lecture was established to recognise individuals making significant research advances in the areas of food, health and nutrition. The Lecture was named for the world class FOODplus Research Centre which is a joint venture between the Functional Food group at the University of Adelaide’s Waite Campus and the Child Nutrition Research Centre at the Women’s and Children’s Health Research Institute. FOODplus is undertaking research linking sustainable agriculture, food and nutrition to improve human health. This research fosters economic relationships with industry and coal-face agriculture, creates research sustainability and translates nutrition research into food products with real health outcomes.

To be followed by drinks and nibbles

Contact: Dr Amanda Able (email), School of Agriculture, Food and Wine, University of Adelaide, Business: +61 8 8303 7245

Advertisements

July 27, 2010

Waite Research Institute Launch

Posted in Adelaide, news, Podcasts, Research, science tagged , , , , , , at 11:17 pm by cascius

Congratulations to the Waite Research Institute on its launch!

If you missed the launch, you can listen to Prof Roger Leigh’s talk  via this link.

May 4, 2010

Yale University Professor presents:The evolution of the genetic code

Posted in Adelaide, news, Research, science, seminar, Uncategorized tagged , , , at 6:33 am by cascius

Professor Dieter Söll from Yale University will be guest speaker at the  3rd Bob Symons lecture, ‘The evolution of the genetic code: a work in progress‘:

At the time of its elucidation the genetic code was suggested to be universal in all organisms, and the result of a ‘frozen accident’ unable to evolve further even if the current state were suboptimal. How do we see the genetic code today – 40 years after the familiar ‘alphabet’ with 20 amino acids was established?  Professor Soll, with over 470 scientific publications, has led the team which discovered selenocysteine and pyrrolysine, the 21st and 22nd amino acids which are directly inserted into growing polypeptides during translation. Based on the realization that protein plasticity is a feature of living cells, man-made expansion of the genetic code has begun by adding non-standard amino acids to the repertoire of the cell. Professor Soll will discuss these present evolutionary developments and how they underpin the creation of new organisms in the realm of synthetic biology.

Date/Time: Monday 24th May, 4pm
Location: Plant Research Centre Auditorium, Waite Campus
School of Agriculture, Food & Wine Named Lecture Series: The Bob Symons Lecture 2010
Contact: Dr Amanda Able, School of Agriculture, Food and Wine, University of Adelaide, Business: +61 8 8303 7245

At the time of its elucidation the genetic code was suggested to be universal in all organisms, and the result of a ‘frozen accident’ unable to evolve further even if the current state were suboptimal. How do we see the genetic code today – 40 years after the familiar ‘alphabet’ with 20 amino acids was established? Of course, the ‘genetic code’ is the product of its interpretation by the translational machinery and it is only static as long as the components of this machinery do not evolve or are strictly conserved between organisms. Professor Soll, with over 470 scientific publications, has led the team which discovered selenocysteine and pyrrolysine, the 21st and 22nd amino acids which are directly inserted into growing polypeptides during translation. Based on the realization that protein plasticity is a feature of living cells, man-made expansion of the genetic code has begun by adding non-standard amino acids to the repertoire of the cell. Professor Soll will discuss these present evolutionary developments and how they underpin the creation of new organisms in the realm of synthetic biology.

March 9, 2010

Genetics & Epigenetics of Flowering-Inaugural Keith W Finlay Lecture

Posted in Uncategorized tagged , , , , , , , , at 10:52 pm by cascius

Date/Time: Monday, 22 March 2010, 4:00 pm

Location: Plant Research Centre Auditorium, Waite Campus

School of Agriculture, Food & Wine Named Lecture Series: The Keith W Finlay Lecture 2010

Genetics and Epigenetics of Flowering

Speaker: Dr Liz Dennis, CSIRO Fellow, CSIRO Plant Industry

Dr Dennis is internationally recognised as a leading plant molecular biologist. Her contributions include defining the molecular pathway for low oxygen response in plants, studying cotton fibre development and unlocking the secrets of the regulation of flowering. Flowering is one of the most critical stages in the life of a plant. Genes controlling flowering time have been identified in both Arabidopsis and cereals and their regulation in response to environmental cues studied. Epigenetic regulation of genes is emerging as a major player in controlling development and response to environmental conditions. One of the best studied examples of epigenetic regulation occurs during vernalisation – the promotion of flowering by cold. Research by Dr Dennis and her team in both Arabidopsis and cereals, has shown that epigenetic regulation of genes prevents vernalisation responsive plants from being triggered to flower by the long days of autumn and flowering. In recognition of her contribution to plant molecular biology, Dr Dennis has been asked to deliver the inaugural Keith W Finlay Lecture.

Keith Warren Finlay was employed as the Senior Plant Breeder and Crop Geneticist at the Waite Campus of the University of Adelaide in 1955. During his time at the Waite (1955-1969), Finlay was responsible for building the reputation and scale of the Waite’s cereal breeding programs through his mechanical innovations and collection of large numbers of barley and wheat cultivars. After leaving the University, Finlay was the Deputy-Director General of the International Centre for the Improvement of Wheat and Maize influencing the development of plant breeding internationally. He died in 1980.

Contact: Dr Amanda Able (email), School of Agriculture, Food and Wine, University of Adelaide, Business: +61 8 8303 7245