June 21, 2010

Free Lecture: Winemaking – A Continuum between Art and Science?

Posted in Adelaide, news, Research, science, seminar, social tagged , , , , , , at 6:17 am by cascius

If you have an interst in wine and wine making, then this lecture on Monday 12th July delivered by Louisa Rose from Yalumba is a must!

Date/Time: Monday 12th July, 4pm

Location: Plant Research Centre Auditorium, Waite Campus

School of Agriculture, Food & Wine Named Lecture Series: The A.R. Hickinbotham Lecture 2010

Winemaking – A Continuum between Art and Science?

Most winemakers sit somewhere on the continuum between being pure artists or scientists.  Arguably the best wines are made by those that sit somewhere between the two; knowing where to and when to rely on their instincts and experience and when to reach for the lecture notes, text book or phone.  Without going into a debate on what is science, it’s fair to say that winemakers have different needs of the scientific and research community that fall into three main types. The “Oh my gosh something has gone wrong and I need help” type; the “I wonder what I can do to make this more efficient or understand it better” type, and the “blue sky – I never would have thought! – pure research but sometimes revolutionary” type.  This lecture will discuss these ideas and give examples where all have been or are relevant to current Australian winemaking.

The inaugural A.R. Hickinbotham Lecture is named in honour of the former Roseworthy Lecturer who is regarded as the father of Australian oenology (wine-making) education. This Lecture recognises individuals that have had an impact on the wine industry and are world leaders in the field of oenology. Alan Robb Hickinbotham (1898-1959) joined the staff at Roseworthy College in 1929 as a Lecturer in Physical and Chemical Sciences. In 1936, he established the nation’s first wine-making course which evolved into the University of Adelaide’s world-renowned Bachelor of Viticulture and Oenology which is now run at the Waite Campus. Alan R. Hickinbotham remained at Roseworthy College until 1948. His research and writing on wine-making under Australian conditions laid the foundation for a technically advanced Australian wine industry. The Hickinbotham family continued their father’s passion for wine through their ongoing interests in viticulture and wine production. The National Wine Centre has recognised the Hickinbotham family by naming its major function hall after the family while the Hickinbotham Roseworthy Wine Science Laboratory was established at the University’s Waite Campus in 1998 with the family’s support.

To be followed by drinks and nibbles

Contact: Dr Amanda Able (email), School of Agriculture, Food and Wine, University of Adelaide, Business: +61 8 8303 7245

March 9, 2010

Genetics & Epigenetics of Flowering-Inaugural Keith W Finlay Lecture

Posted in Uncategorized tagged , , , , , , , , at 10:52 pm by cascius

Date/Time: Monday, 22 March 2010, 4:00 pm

Location: Plant Research Centre Auditorium, Waite Campus

School of Agriculture, Food & Wine Named Lecture Series: The Keith W Finlay Lecture 2010

Genetics and Epigenetics of Flowering

Speaker: Dr Liz Dennis, CSIRO Fellow, CSIRO Plant Industry

Dr Dennis is internationally recognised as a leading plant molecular biologist. Her contributions include defining the molecular pathway for low oxygen response in plants, studying cotton fibre development and unlocking the secrets of the regulation of flowering. Flowering is one of the most critical stages in the life of a plant. Genes controlling flowering time have been identified in both Arabidopsis and cereals and their regulation in response to environmental cues studied. Epigenetic regulation of genes is emerging as a major player in controlling development and response to environmental conditions. One of the best studied examples of epigenetic regulation occurs during vernalisation – the promotion of flowering by cold. Research by Dr Dennis and her team in both Arabidopsis and cereals, has shown that epigenetic regulation of genes prevents vernalisation responsive plants from being triggered to flower by the long days of autumn and flowering. In recognition of her contribution to plant molecular biology, Dr Dennis has been asked to deliver the inaugural Keith W Finlay Lecture.

Keith Warren Finlay was employed as the Senior Plant Breeder and Crop Geneticist at the Waite Campus of the University of Adelaide in 1955. During his time at the Waite (1955-1969), Finlay was responsible for building the reputation and scale of the Waite’s cereal breeding programs through his mechanical innovations and collection of large numbers of barley and wheat cultivars. After leaving the University, Finlay was the Deputy-Director General of the International Centre for the Improvement of Wheat and Maize influencing the development of plant breeding internationally. He died in 1980.

Contact: Dr Amanda Able (email), School of Agriculture, Food and Wine, University of Adelaide, Business: +61 8 8303 7245