August 25, 2010

Are ‘refined’ carbohydrates worse than saturated fat?

Posted in Adelaide, Research, schools, science, seminar tagged , , , , , , , , , , at 6:07 am by cascius

The Inaugural Innovation in Food Lecture

Date/Time: Monday 6th September, 4pm

Location: Plant Research Centre Auditorium, Waite Campus

School of Agriculture, Food & Wine Named Lecture Series: Innovation in Food Lecture 2010

Speaker: Professor Jennie Brand-Miller, University of Sydney

Are ‘refined’ carbohydrates worse than saturated fat?

The take home message from health authorities for the past three decades has been ‘eat less fat, especially saturated fat’. Now a new paradigm is arising: that the processed carbohydrates which replaced the energy from fat, may increase the risk of obesity, diabetes and heart disease more so than fat – a finding that has enormous implications for the Australian food and agricultural industry.  Both quantity and quality of carbohydrate are relevant to the debate. The rate of digestion and absorption of carbohydrates is assessed as their ‘glycemic index’ (GI). This lecture will focus on well-designed studies demonstrating that carbohydrates that are slowly digested and absorbed (i.e. low GI carbs) are good for health and reduce risk factors associated with lifestyle-related diseases such as diabetes. Improving carbohydrate quality is therefore a better approach to health and sustainability issues than ‘ditching the carbs’. Professor Jennie Brand-Miller is recognised for her work on carbohydrates and diabetes. Her books under the series title The New Glucose Revolution have sold over 3.5 million copies worldwide and appeared in 12 languages.

The inaugural Innovation in Food Lecture was established to recognise individuals making significant research advances in the areas of food, health and nutrition. The Lecture was named for the world class FOODplus Research Centre which is a joint venture between the Functional Food group at the University of Adelaide’s Waite Campus and the Child Nutrition Research Centre at the Women’s and Children’s Health Research Institute. FOODplus is undertaking research linking sustainable agriculture, food and nutrition to improve human health. This research fosters economic relationships with industry and coal-face agriculture, creates research sustainability and translates nutrition research into food products with real health outcomes.

To be followed by drinks and nibbles

Contact: Dr Amanda Able (email), School of Agriculture, Food and Wine, University of Adelaide, Business: +61 8 8303 7245

June 21, 2010

Free Lecture: Winemaking – A Continuum between Art and Science?

Posted in Adelaide, news, Research, science, seminar, social tagged , , , , , , at 6:17 am by cascius

If you have an interst in wine and wine making, then this lecture on Monday 12th July delivered by Louisa Rose from Yalumba is a must!

Date/Time: Monday 12th July, 4pm

Location: Plant Research Centre Auditorium, Waite Campus

School of Agriculture, Food & Wine Named Lecture Series: The A.R. Hickinbotham Lecture 2010

Winemaking – A Continuum between Art and Science?

Most winemakers sit somewhere on the continuum between being pure artists or scientists.  Arguably the best wines are made by those that sit somewhere between the two; knowing where to and when to rely on their instincts and experience and when to reach for the lecture notes, text book or phone.  Without going into a debate on what is science, it’s fair to say that winemakers have different needs of the scientific and research community that fall into three main types. The “Oh my gosh something has gone wrong and I need help” type; the “I wonder what I can do to make this more efficient or understand it better” type, and the “blue sky – I never would have thought! – pure research but sometimes revolutionary” type.  This lecture will discuss these ideas and give examples where all have been or are relevant to current Australian winemaking.

The inaugural A.R. Hickinbotham Lecture is named in honour of the former Roseworthy Lecturer who is regarded as the father of Australian oenology (wine-making) education. This Lecture recognises individuals that have had an impact on the wine industry and are world leaders in the field of oenology. Alan Robb Hickinbotham (1898-1959) joined the staff at Roseworthy College in 1929 as a Lecturer in Physical and Chemical Sciences. In 1936, he established the nation’s first wine-making course which evolved into the University of Adelaide’s world-renowned Bachelor of Viticulture and Oenology which is now run at the Waite Campus. Alan R. Hickinbotham remained at Roseworthy College until 1948. His research and writing on wine-making under Australian conditions laid the foundation for a technically advanced Australian wine industry. The Hickinbotham family continued their father’s passion for wine through their ongoing interests in viticulture and wine production. The National Wine Centre has recognised the Hickinbotham family by naming its major function hall after the family while the Hickinbotham Roseworthy Wine Science Laboratory was established at the University’s Waite Campus in 1998 with the family’s support.

To be followed by drinks and nibbles

Contact: Dr Amanda Able (email), School of Agriculture, Food and Wine, University of Adelaide, Business: +61 8 8303 7245

May 4, 2010

Yale University Professor presents:The evolution of the genetic code

Posted in Adelaide, news, Research, science, seminar, Uncategorized tagged , , , at 6:33 am by cascius

Professor Dieter Söll from Yale University will be guest speaker at the  3rd Bob Symons lecture, ‘The evolution of the genetic code: a work in progress‘:

At the time of its elucidation the genetic code was suggested to be universal in all organisms, and the result of a ‘frozen accident’ unable to evolve further even if the current state were suboptimal. How do we see the genetic code today – 40 years after the familiar ‘alphabet’ with 20 amino acids was established?  Professor Soll, with over 470 scientific publications, has led the team which discovered selenocysteine and pyrrolysine, the 21st and 22nd amino acids which are directly inserted into growing polypeptides during translation. Based on the realization that protein plasticity is a feature of living cells, man-made expansion of the genetic code has begun by adding non-standard amino acids to the repertoire of the cell. Professor Soll will discuss these present evolutionary developments and how they underpin the creation of new organisms in the realm of synthetic biology.

Date/Time: Monday 24th May, 4pm
Location: Plant Research Centre Auditorium, Waite Campus
School of Agriculture, Food & Wine Named Lecture Series: The Bob Symons Lecture 2010
Contact: Dr Amanda Able, School of Agriculture, Food and Wine, University of Adelaide, Business: +61 8 8303 7245

At the time of its elucidation the genetic code was suggested to be universal in all organisms, and the result of a ‘frozen accident’ unable to evolve further even if the current state were suboptimal. How do we see the genetic code today – 40 years after the familiar ‘alphabet’ with 20 amino acids was established? Of course, the ‘genetic code’ is the product of its interpretation by the translational machinery and it is only static as long as the components of this machinery do not evolve or are strictly conserved between organisms. Professor Soll, with over 470 scientific publications, has led the team which discovered selenocysteine and pyrrolysine, the 21st and 22nd amino acids which are directly inserted into growing polypeptides during translation. Based on the realization that protein plasticity is a feature of living cells, man-made expansion of the genetic code has begun by adding non-standard amino acids to the repertoire of the cell. Professor Soll will discuss these present evolutionary developments and how they underpin the creation of new organisms in the realm of synthetic biology.

April 15, 2010

ASELL Science Workshop

Posted in Adelaide, Podcasts, Research, schools, science, seminar tagged , , , , , at 1:00 am by cascius

The ASELL Science Workshop was held on the 6th-9th of April 2010 at the University of Adelaide. It involved the disciplines biology, chemistry and physics. Universities were invited to send 2-person teams (one academic and one student). Thes workshop included a mixture of discussions and laboratory-based activities. Each team showcased one experiment from its home institution. Up to 4 teams from each institution per discipline were allowed to attend. Institutions were encouraged to submit experiments they considered good or experiments that needed major improvement.

Listen to the podcast from the workshop.

January 28, 2010

Science pre-enrolment podcasts

Posted in Podcasts, science, seminar, study tagged , , , at 5:14 am by cascius

If you missed the pre enrolment session for Science, fear not. You can download the podcasts here:

January 19, 2010

IPAS hosts Harvard University Physics Professor

Posted in Research, science, seminar tagged , , , , at 11:50 pm by cascius

Professor Eric Mazur the Balkanski Professor of Physics and Applied Physics at Harvard University visited Adelaide University yesterday to present his talk “Nonlinear optics at the nanoscale” at IPAS.

We hear it on good authority (Mike Seyfang) that this was a most interesting and exciting talk by Professor Mazur. Click here for more information.

Climate Change & the Wine industry in 2010

Posted in Adelaide, Research, science, seminar tagged , , , at 5:08 am by cascius

“Research indicating that greenhouse gases produced by humans are very likely to have contributed to the recent warming of the climate, and that concentrations of these gases are projected to increase in the future, is to me compelling and, of course, central to my work. I do not think any person working in the wine industry can deny how important climate is to their product……so I believe an understanding of the changing climate, and potential implications of this, is essential to the future of this industry”. Dr Leanne Webb, Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Melbourne/CSIRO

Listen to Dr Leanne Webb’ s lecture, ‘Climate change: Current status and future strategies for the Australian wine industry‘ on:

Date/Time: Monday, 15 February 2010, 4:00 pm

Location: Plant Research Centre Auditorium, Waite Campus

Cost: FREE

School of Agriculture, Food & Wine Named Lecture Series: The Robyn van Heeswijck Lecture 2010

November 17, 2009

Exploding stars discovered across universe reveal astonishing fact…

Posted in Adelaide, news, science, seminar at 6:06 am by cascius

Want to know more?

Keys to universe logo

Then come along to the Keys to the Universe public lecture presented by The University of Adelaide’s School of Chemistry & Physics on Thursday 19 November at 6.30pm, Union Hall

ASTONISHING FACT REVEALED: The expansion of the Universe is speeding up!  Learn about how the universe is dominated by a mysterious “dark energy” that drives cosmic acceleration.

image of Robert Kirshner

The esteemed Professor Robert P. Kirshner from Harvard University will present his exciting lecture – “Exploding Stars and the Accelerating Cosmos: Einstein’s Blunder Undone”

Venue, Time & Date: Union Hall, 6:30pm Thursday 19th November 2009

September 18, 2009

Podcast – Prof Fulvio Melia public lecture

Posted in Adelaide, news, Podcasts, Research, science, seminar, social at 5:24 am by cminge

Keys_to_the_universeFor anyone who missed last night’s terrific free public lecture, make like a gravitron escaping from a spinning black hole and get a move on to download the podcast!

Podcast: Cracking the Einstein Code: Relativity and the Birth of Black Hole Physics

Speaker: Prof Fulvio Melia

Stay tuned for announcements of the next Keys to the Universe lecture in the series!

September 16, 2009

Free Public Lecture -Fulvio Melia

Posted in Adelaide, news, Podcasts, Research, science, seminar, social at 12:54 am by cminge

Picture 6The University of Adelaide’s School of Chemistry & Physics presents a free Public Lecture…

Cracking the Einstein Code – Relativity and the Birth of Black Hole Physics” presented by Fulvio Melia, Professor of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Arizona and Associate Editor of the Astrophysical Journal Letters

Thursday 17 September at 6pm Napier Lecture Theatre 102

Level 1 Napier Building (follow the signs), University of Adelaide, North Terrace

Admission: Free

Prof Fulvio Melia will present the exciting account of how Albert Einstein’s mathematical code for general relativity was cracked. Albert Einstein’s theory of general relativity describes the effect of gravitation on the shape of space and the flow of time. But for more than four decades after its publication, the theory remained largely a curiosity for scientists; however accurate it seemed, Einstein’s mathematical code—represented by six interlocking equations—was one of the most difficult to crack in all of science.

That is, until a twenty-nine-year-old Cambridge graduate solved the great riddle in 1963. Roy Kerr’s solution emerged coincidentally with the discovery of black holes that same year and provided fertile testing ground—at long last—for general relativity. Today, scientists routinely cite the Kerr solution, but even among specialists, few know the story of how Kerr cracked Einstein’s code.

Fulvio Melia offers an eyewitness account of the events leading up to Kerr’s great discovery. Cracking the Einstein Code vividly describes how luminaries such as Karl Schwarzschild, David Hilbert, and Emmy Noether set the stage for the Kerr solution; how Kerr came to make his breakthrough; and how scientists such as Roger Penrose, Kip Thorne, and Stephen Hawking used the accomplishment to refine and expand modern astronomy and physics. Today more than 300 million supermassive black holes are suspected of anchoring their host galaxies across the cosmos, and the Kerr solution is what astronomers and astrophysicists use to describe much of their behavior.

By unmasking the history behind the search for a real world solution to Einstein’s field equations, Melia offers a firsthand account of an important but untold story. Sometimes dramatic, often exhilarating, but always attuned to the human element, Cracking the Einstein Code is ultimately a showcase of how important science gets done.

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